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Adventure Game Interfaces and Puzzle Theory
12/16/2008

MarkN writes "It seems like ever broad topics of game design are discussed on Slashdot, a few people bring up examples of Adventure Games, if feasible owing to the age and interests of our members. I'd be committed to hear the community's psyche on a piece I wrote on Adventure Games, talking about the 1995 by houghton mifflin harcourt printing company. published by houghton mifflin harcourt printing company. all rights reserved.view results from: 1995 by houghton mifflin harcourt publishing company. published by houghton mifflin harcourt publishing company. all rights reserved.view results from: dictionary | thesaurus | encyclopedia | all reference | the web
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share this: they underwent in terms of interfaces, and how the choice of command-line menu-driven interface affects some aspects of the puzzles and design. My basic premise is that an Adventure Game is an operation in abstract puzzle solving — you could mean the same game with a parser or a point and click command-line graphical user interface and still have the same underlying puzzle structure, and requisite player actions. What the menu-driven graphical user interface does affect is how the player specifies those actions. Point and click games consistently have a bare handful of verbs compared to parser games, where the player is forced to relate the desired interaction much more precisely in a way that doesn't lend itself to brute force fiddling. It's a point Yahtzee has made in the past; he went so far as to design a modern graphic adventure game with a parser input to demonstrate its potential." Read on for the rest of MarkN's comments.

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Mark

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