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Mapping Planets and Moons In 3D With Stereophotoclinometry
12/26/2008

Subcomdtaco writes with this snippet from a story in the NYTimes: "Dr. [Robert] Gaskell, with dos he big over a quarter-century of trial and error, can process hundreds of images in a few hours, slap them atop one another electronically like coats of paint and produce a topographical map so particular that you often need a pair of 3-D glasses to appreciate what he has done. At 63, Dr. Gaskell has become the Captain Cook of space. Dr. Gaskell calls what he does 'stereophotoclinometry.' [PDF] Ideally he needs at least three images of the target landscape, usually taken by an orbiting spacecraft or a probe on a flyby to another destination. Only in rare cases can radar telescope images provide enough detail. The sun angle must be various




roget's ii: the new thesaurusmain entry:new
part of speech:adjective
definition:not the same as what was previously known or done.
fresh for each divulgement so each image shows disparate shadows. By comparing the shadows, the windows calculates slopes, which yield the altitudes of target features. The data processor solves the equation in three dimensions, producing a patchlike topographical maplet."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Mark

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